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Stretch to Win 2nd edition (2017)
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Welcome to free content & videos of the BEST mobility & flexibility assessments & programs for all sports & fitness activities! All content in this blog is based on the NEW "Stretch to Win" 2nd edition book by authors & mobility-flexibility experts Ann Frederick & Chris Frederick. The book was released June 2017 & will be supported by this blog, which will contain videos explaining the assessments & programs in the book. However this blog does not replace the book; the book is necessary for understanding the history, method & science behind what makes the Stretch to Win method the fastest, easiest & most effective way to accurately assess your mobility & flexibility for personalized solutions. Resources: Get “Stretch to Win” 2nd edition here: >>> Amazon.com: http://budurl.com/STWbook2e Or >>> Human Kinetics: http://www.humankinetics.com/products/all-products/Stretch-to-Win-2nd-Edition

 

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Top tags: stretch  stretch to win  mobility  fascial stretch therapy  fst  flexibility  stretching  dynamic stretching  fst gives hope  levator scapulae  mobility improvement  sport stretch  tight neck  tight shoulder  trigger points 

Great 8™ Mobility Program by Stretch to Win® - rhomboids (alternate option)

Posted By Chris Frederick, Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Please see my earlier post on Thursday, August 10, 2017 for my first, favorite option of mobilizing-stretching the rhomboids in a standing position using a doorpost. That stretch is probably one of the best ways to increase mobility in the mid-thoracic spine, rhomboids and the spiral-power net of fascia more than most other options.

However while people like me who have lots of mobility do not feel any retrictions that need stretching in this “on-all-fours” position, others who are “mobility challenged” definitely will feel this stretch. Of course, it is also an option if you do not have a doorway handy.

For convenience, I re-posted details, guidelines and tips here from the other rhomboid stretch, as the same thing applies:

You may wonder why the rhomboids are stretched if it is most often found to be overly lengthened and in eccentric strain with the common pattern of the upper cross syndrome (UCS).

There are 2 big problems with simply grouping people into a category like UCS:

1.     Syndromes do not really apply to all individuals.

2.     Scapulae display multiple variances of static and dynamic positioning during function based on:

a.     Motor patterning

b.     Fascial adhesions in upper, lower or all fibers

c.      Technique and habits of movement are challenging to change: for example, ballet dancers must reduce the normal thoracic kyphosis while holding their scapulae flat to the coronal plane for esthetics and function. Naturally compensations in the neuro-myofascial systems are numerous and complex. Incidentally these athletes REALLY benefit from this stretch as it helps restore the normal thoracic kyphosis for optimal shoulder function in “normal” day-to-day activities.

Common dysfunctions that are helped with this stretch include: reduction of adhesions and improved activation (especially with adding the alternating contractions of PNF technique) with forward head/shoulder issues; increased mobility of the thoracic spine which is common restricted and tight with many athletes and weight lifters; down regulates the nervous system via release of tension in the sympathetic ganglion chain.

Simply follow the attached video, which coaches you through the entire movement for both sides of your body.

Tips:

  • Self assessment
    • Do the movement on both sides to determine if there is an imbalance.
    • Start and end with the tighter side, otherwise it doesn't matter.
    • Re-assess the movement when done to see if both sides have improved with symmetrical mobility. If not, repeat tight one.
  • If you have any problems getting into the position, doing the movement or have discomfort like pinching in your shoulder or anywhere else, then find a local Fascial Stretch Therapy Provider in our directory here: www.stretchtowin.com
  • If the movement causes or increases pain, then stop and see a health professional to determine the cause of the pain.

 

Videos from this blog support more detail found in my book, "Stretch to Win" - 2nd edition.You may purchase at Amazon.com or Human Kinetics:

Amazon.com: http://budurl.com/STWbook2e

Human Kinetics: http://www.humankinetics.com/products/all-products/Stretch-to-Win-2nd-Edition

 

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER: the content on this blog is for information purposes only and does not constitute medical advise of any kind. If you have pain, any medical condition, have any disability or any doubts about your physical abilities, then consult a physician to determine if you may perform the movements in our videos.

 

 

 

 

 

Tags:  FST  mobility  stretch  stretch to win 

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StretchWave™ fast for dynamic flexibility

Posted By Chris Frederick, Wednesday, August 16, 2017

At our webinar about our book last week, a listener submitted this question: "Could you please show us an example of your StretchWave fast program?" Below is a short excerpt from chapter 7:

StretchWave fast is our term for what is commonly called dynamic stretching in sports and fitness. Dynamic stretching uses faster tempos and shorter durations to help you achieve dynamic mobility for vigorous and explosive movement in fitness and sports.

Dynamic stretching is usually done as part of the warm-up before training, competition, or other activities (see table 5.1 in chapter 5 for parameters). Optimal preparatory programs should remove all feelings of tightness or stiffness and provide adequate mobility so you to feel ready to train or compete.

The StretchWave fast should be done before you perform sport-specific ballistic movements. Examples are explosive movements with quick starts and stops such as sprinting, kicking, throwing, swinging, jumping, and leaping. All body regions used in these movements are in the power nets (described in detail in chapter 2).

Tags:  dynamic stretching  mobility  stretch  stretch to win 

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Great 8™ Mobility Program by Stretch to Win® - levator scapulae & the Power Net

Posted By Chris Frederick, Sunday, August 13, 2017
Paste embed code from YouTube or other video sharing service.

(Note: please see my first blog under the Great 8 topic for visual table of the G-8)

I discussed the third of the Core 4 of the upper body key muscles - rhomboids - and their fascial connections of what we have named the ‘Power’ (aka Spiral) Net.

Here we continue with the fourth & last key muscle & the fascial net within which it lies – the levator scapulae & the Deep Back Arm Net Net.

Most manual therapists & others would agree that many of their clients/patients have active & latent trigger points (‘TPs’). And even for those who do not believe in the concept of TPs, it would be difficult to argue against the existence of what their clients/patients would call “knots, ropes &/or tightness” in the region of the levator scapulae (& of course, the upper trapezius).

There is a technique called “The Butterfly” in Fascial Stretch Therapy™ (FST™) that Ann Frederick created, that she claims often eliminates or resolves all active TPs in the upper traps & levator scap. I have definitely observed this to be true many, many times since I learned FST in 1998. And I have heard this to be true from many of our thousands of students.

Some of the common dysfunctions that are helped with this stretch include: elimination or reduction of TPs in the neck/shoulder, headaches, shoulder tightness/pain, down regulates the nervous system.

 

Simply follow the attached video, which coaches you through the entire movement for one side of your body, so be sure to repeat other side.

Tips:

  • Self assessment
    • Do the movement on both sides to determine if there is an imbalance.
    • Start and end with the tighter side, otherwise it doesn't matter.
    • Re-assess the movement when done to see if both sides have improved with symmetrical mobility. If not, repeat tight one.
  • If you have any problems getting into the position, doing the movement or have discomfort like pinching in your shoulder or anywhere else, then find a local Fascial Stretch Therapy Provider in our directory here: https://stretchtowin.site-ym.com/?page=TherapistDirectory. 
  • If the movement causes or increases pain, then stop and see a health professional to determine the cause of the pain.

 

Important note:
If one cannot resolve chronic neck tightness or discomfort in one’s neck from the levator scap stretch shown in the attached video or in the rest of the G-8 program, I suggest finding a local FST provider on our directory at https://stretchtowin.site-ym.com/?page=TherapistDirectory.  FST providers have been trained to assess, treat & train your fascia system based on your individual needs & goals. The result is faster, more effective outcomes that you can them maintain on a self-mobility program that is designed for you.

 

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER: the content on this blog is for information purposes only and does not constitute medical advise of any kind. If you have pain, any medical condition, have any disability or any doubts about your physical abilities, then consult a physician to determine if you may perform the movements in our videos.

 

 

 

Tags:  levator scapulae  mobility  stretch  stretch to win  stretching  tight neck  tight shoulder  trigger points 

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Great 8™ Mobility Program by Stretch to Win® - rhomboids + Power Net

Posted By Chris Frederick, Thursday, August 10, 2017

In my last post, I discussed the second of the Core 4 of the upper body key muscles - rotator cuff - and their fascial connections of the Deep Back Arm Net.

Here we continue with the third key muscle & the fascial net within which it lies – the rhomboids & the Power Net. You may wonder why the rhomboids are stretched if it is most often found to be overly lengthened and in eccentric strain with the common pattern of the upper cross syndrome (UCS).

There are 2 big problems with simply grouping people into a category like UCS:

1.     Syndromes do not really apply to all individuals.

2.     Scapulae display multiple variances of static and dynamic positioning during function based on:

a.     Motor patterning

b.     Fascial adhesions in upper, lower or all fibers

c.      Technique and habits of movement are challenging to change: for example, ballet dancers must reduce the normal thoracic kyphosis while holding their scapulae flat to the coronal plane for esthetics and function. Naturally compensations in the neuro-myofascial systems are numerous and complex. Incidentally these athletes REALLY benefit from this stretch as it helps restore the normal thoracic kyphosis for optimal shoulder function in “normal” day-to-day activities.

Common dysfunctions that are helped with this stretch include: reduction of adhesions and improved activation (especially with adding the alternating contractions of PNF technique) with forward head/shoulder issues; increased mobility of the thoracic spine which is common restricted and tight with many athletes and weight lifters; down regulates the nervous system via release of tension in the sympathetic ganglion chain.

Simply follow the attached video, which coaches you through the entire movement for both sides of your body.

[NOTE: this video is a standing rhomboid mobility stretch; our book shows the ground stretch version].

Tips:

  • Self assessment
    • Do the movement on both sides to determine if there is an imbalance.
    • Start and end with the tighter side, otherwise it doesn't matter.
    • Re-assess the movement when done to see if both sides have improved with symmetrical mobility. If not, repeat tight one.
  • If you have any problems getting into the position, doing the movement or have discomfort like pinching in your shoulder or anywhere else, then find a local Fascial Stretch Therapy Provider in our directory here: www.stretchtowin.com. 
  • If the movement causes or increases pain, then stop and see a health professional to determine the cause of the pain.

 

Videos from this blog support more detail found in my book, "Stretch to Win" - 2nd edition.You may purchase at Amazon.com or Human Kinetics:

Amazon.com: http://budurl.com/STWbook2e

Human Kinetics: http://www.humankinetics.com/products/all-products/Stretch-to-Win-2nd-Edition

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER: the content on this blog is for information purposes only and does not constitute medical advise of any kind. If you have pain, any medical condition, have any disability or any doubts about your physical abilities, then consult a physician to determine if you may perform the movements in our videos.

 

Tags:  fascial stretch therapy  fst  fst gives hope  mobility  stretch  stretch to win 

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Great 8™ Mobility Program by Stretch to Win® - rotator cuff et al

Posted By Chris Frederick, Wednesday, August 9, 2017

In my last post, I discussed the first of the Core 4 of the upper body key muscles and their fascial connections – pectoralis minor & the Deep Front Arm Net.

Here we continue with the second key muscle & the fascial net within which it lies – the rotator cuff & the Deep Back Arm Net. One major reason why we put it after the pec minor is that it is commonly short, tight & shifts the shoulder forward. Among many other things, it puts the rotator cuff at a huge disadvantage in function due to many things like joint mal-alignment which causes cumulative deterioration of both cartilage & tendon over time.

While larger key muscles like the lats discussed in an earlier blog play a big role in powering athletic movements, the rotator cuff are more about properly guiding the head of the humerus and other more fine motor activities that enhance the accuracy or precision of intention during power movements.

Common dysfunctions that may be corrected when mobilizing & stretching the rotator cuff & its Deep Back Arm Net include: forward shoulder & head & neck-shoulder-arm pain. Many early conditions of tendonitis & bursitis resolve mostly from the pec minor reset followed by the rotator cuff if restrictions are present there. Of course flexibility must be balanced by dynamic stabilization strength & other factors depending on the specific sport or activity.

Simply follow the attached video, which coaches you through the entire movement for both sides of your body.

Tips:

  • Self assessment
    • Do the movement on both sides to determine if there is an imbalance.
    • Start and end with the tighter side, otherwise it doesn't matter.
    • Re-assess the movement when done to see if both sides have improved with symmetrical mobility. If not, repeat tight one.
  • If you have any problems getting into the position, doing the movement or have discomfort like pinching in your shoulder or anywhere else, then find a local Fascial Stretch Therapy Provider in our directory here: www.stretchtowin.com. 
  • If the movement causes or increases pain, then stop and see a health professional to determine the cause of the pain.

 

>>> TIME SENSITIVE ANNOUNCEMENT: FREE WEBINAR TOMORROW with Ann & Chris Frederick on August 10, 2017!! <<<

       World’s largest sports & fitness publisher – Human Kinetics – hosting the Fredericks, authors of the new 2nd edition of “Stretch to Win”.

       Ask them any question about assessing, correcting & improving mobility & flexibility when you register here: http://budurl.com/STWbookWebinar

 

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER: the content on this blog is for information purposes only and does not constitute medical advise of any kind. If you have pain, any medical condition, have any disability or any doubts about your physical abilities, then consult a physician to determine if you may perform the movements in our videos.

Tags:  flexibility  mobility  stretch  stretch to win 

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Great 8™ Mobility Program by Stretch to Win® - pectoralis minor et al

Posted By Chris Frederick, Tuesday, August 8, 2017
Paste embed code from YouTube or other video sharing service.

In my last post, I discussed the fourth of the Great 8 (aka “the G-8”) key muscles and their fascial connections – latissimus dorsi. That completes the “Core 4” of the lower body, with the lats bridging the fascial connection between the lower & upper body.

Here we continue with the “Core 4” of the upper body to complete the Great 8 – starting with the key muscle pectoralis minor along with the fascial net within which it lies called the Deep Front Arm Net.

Instead of performing an isolated mobility exercise or stretch of the pec minor, a functional fascial anatomy approach recognizes the rest of the connected net: coracobrachialis, short head of the biceps brachii, fascia of the radius continuing into the wrist & muscles of the thumb. Associated one joint muscles also go for the ride when the arm is held or used away and out to the side of the body: long head of the biceps, brachialis, supinator, wrist & finger flexors. The pectoralis major & Superficial Front Arm Net will also be affected to greater or lesser degrees depending on positioning biases of the arm/hand with rotation and pronation/supination (those details not discussed here).

Common dysfunctions that may be corrected when mobilizing & stretching the pec minor & its Deep Front Net include: forward shoulder & head, thoracic outlet syndrome, some categories of paresthesias including carpal tunnel syndrome (i.e. radiating pain or soreness down shoulder and/or arm/hand) & more.

Simply follow the attached video, which coaches you through the entire movement for both sides of your body.

Tips:

  • Self assessment
  • If you have any problems getting into the position, doing the movement or have discomfort like pinching in your shoulder or anywhere else, then find a local Fascial Stretch Therapy Provider in our directory here: www.stretchtowin.com. 
  • If the movement causes or increases pain, then stop and see a health professional to determine the cause of the pain.

 

>>> TIME SENSITIVE ANNOUNCEMENT: FREE WEBINAR WITH Ann & Chris Frederick on August 10, 2017!! <<<

       World’s largest sports & fitness publisher – Human Kinetics – hosting the Fredericks, authors of the new 2nd edition of “Stretch to Win”.

       Ask them any question about assessing, correcting & improving mobility & flexibility when you register here: http://budurl.com/STWbookWebinar


LIABILITY DISCLAIMER: the content on this blog is for information purposes only and does not constitute medical advise of any kind. If you have pain, any medical condition, have any disability or any doubts about your physical abilities, then consult a physician to determine if you may perform the movements in our videos.

 

 

 

Tags:  fst  mobility  stretch  stretch to win  stretching 

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Great 8™ Mobility Program by Stretch to Win® - the latissimus dorsi et al

Posted By Chris Frederick, Monday, August 7, 2017

In my last post, I discussed the third of the Great 8 (aka “the G-8”) key muscles and their fascial connections – hip flexors. Here we continue with the fourth one – the latissimus dorsi and what we call the Power Net in which it is located & functions with its myofascial synergists.

Lack of full range of motion, mobility & flexibility in the lats & its fascial synergists (e.g. opposite gluteus maximus) may produce the following common dysfunctions that may or may not be associated with pain: weakness, imbalance, gait dysfunction, loss of broad spectrum of athletic performance (deficits in throwing, swinging, swimming & general abilities of power, speed, agility & recovery). More details are of covered in our new 2nd edition of “Stretch to Win”, available at Amazon here:  http://budurl.com/STWbook2e

Simply follow the attached video, which coaches you through the entire movement for both sides of your body.

Tips:

  • Self assessment
    • Do the movement on both sides to determine if there is an imbalance.
    • Start and end with the tighter side, otherwise it doesn't matter.
    • Re-assess the movement when done to see if both sides have improved with symmetrical mobility. If not, repeat tight one.
  • If you have any problems getting into the position, doing the movement or have discomfort like pinching in your hip or anywhere else, then find a local Fascial Stretch Therapy Provider in our directory here: www.stretchtowin.com. 
  • If the movement causes or increases pain, then stop and see a health professional to determine the cause of the pain.

 

FREE WEBINAR THIS THURSDAY with Ann & Chris Frederick on August 10, 2017 >>> REGISTER HERE: http://budurl.com/STWbookWebinar

World’s largest sports & fitness publisher – Human Kinetics – hosting the Fredericks, authors of the new 2nd edition of “Stretch to Win”.

Ask them any question about assessing, correcting & improving mobility & flexibility when you register here: http://budurl.com/STWbookWebinar

 

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER: the content on this blog is for information purposes only and does not constitute medical advise of any kind. If you have pain, any medical condition, have any disability or any doubts about your physical abilities, then consult a physician to determine if you may perform the movements in our videos.

Tags:  fascial stretch therapy  fst  mobility  sport stretch  stretch  stretch to win 

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Great 8™ Mobility Program by Stretch to Win® - hip flexors

Posted By Chris Frederick, Sunday, August 6, 2017

In my last post, I discussed the second of the Great 8 (aka “the G-8”) key muscles and their fascial connections – the quadratus lumborum or “QL”. Here we continue with the third one – the hip flexors. They include the iliacus, psoas, pectineus, rectus femoris and tensor fascia latae (TFL). Yet keep in mind that the adductor magnus (and to a lesser extent, other muscles) act to assist hip flexion too.

I came up with this particular way of mobilizing & stretching the hip flexors because I have found that it works much better than the traditional kneeling lunge stretch for recovery & post-training. One main reason is that it greatly reduces full body tension by the need to hold one’s core & balance. This results in the client having more success in assessing specific regions of the hip flexors for more effective corrections and releases.

Lack of full range of motion, mobility & flexibility in the hip flexor region may produce the following common dysfunctions that may or may not be associated with pain: weakness, imbalance, gait dysfunction, loss of broad spectrum of athletic performance (deficits in power, speed, agility, recovery) and more. More details are covered in our new 2nd edition of “Stretch to Win” (http://budurl.com/STWbook2e).

Simply follow the attached video, which coaches you through the entire movement for both sides of your body.

Tips:

  • Self assessment
    • Do the movement on both sides to determine if there is an imbalance.
    • Start and end with the tighter side, otherwise it doesn't matter.
    • Re-assess the movement when done to see if both sides have improved with symmetrical mobility. If not, repeat tight one.
  • If you have any problems getting into the position, doing the movement or have discomfort like pinching in your hip or anywhere else, then find a local Fascial Stretch Therapy Provider in our directory here: www.stretchtowin.com. 
  • If the movement causes or increases pain, then stop and see a health professional to determine the cause of the pain.

 

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER: the content on this blog is for information purposes only and does not constitute medical advise of any kind. If you have pain, any medical condition, have any disability or any doubts about your physical abilities, then consult a physician to determine if you may perform the movements in our videos.

Tags:  Fascial Stretch Therapy  mobility  stretch  stretch to win 

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Great 8™ Mobility Program by Stretch to Win® - quadratus lumborum

Posted By Chris Frederick, Saturday, August 5, 2017

In my last post, I discussed the first of the Great 8 (aka “the G-8”) key muscles and their fascial connections – the glute complex. Here we continue with the second one – the quadratus lumborum (aka “QL”).

Janet Travell, MD (given the most credit for  developing trigger point therapy protocols) called the QL “the joker of low back pain” and with good reason. Physicians often mis-diagnosed many patients with back pain because they treated the symptoms and not the cause. This is because many patients complained of pain in various locations of pain in the buttock and hip. Travell had a certain amount of success treating what she called “trigger points” with combinations of injections and spray and stretch protocols (not discussed here) for the QL.

She was on the right track with including stretching of the QL, however I believe she could have had much better results if she would have considered the fascial anatomy and not just the isolated muscle. One of the most important fascial connections is the muscle just next to it – the psoas – and the one right below it – the iliacus. And most professionals are very familiar with various psoas dysfunctions associated with low back pain. So without going into too much detail in a short blog like this, suffice it for me to say that mobilizing and stretching the QL when indicated often helps the iliacus and psoas to release and/or improve function as well. And by so doing can help reduce leg length discrepancies and lumbo-pelvic torsions that can be a source of low back and other pain, weakness and dysfunctional movement patterns.

According to Thomas Myers who authored one of the foremost books on functional fascia anatomy called “Anatomy Trains”, the QL either lies within or has a close functional relationship with the following fascial connections or “nets” as we call it: deep front and lateral nets. Therefore improving the mobility-flexibility of the QL will often also positively affect pain or dysfunction anywhere along the associated fascial net which is illustrated and detailed in my book “Stretch to Win”.

Simply follow the attached video, which coaches you through the entire movement for both sides of your body.

Tips:

  • Self assessment
    • Do the movement on both sides to determine if there is an imbalance.
    • Start and end with the tighter side, otherwise it doesn't matter.
    • Re-assess the movement when done to see if both sides have improved with symmetrical mobility. If not, repeat tight one.
  • If you have any problems getting into the position, doing the movement or have discomfort like pinching in your hip or anywhere else, then find a local Fascial Stretch Therapy Provider in our directory here: www.stretchtowin.com. 
  • If the movement causes or increases pain, then stop and see a health professional to determine the cause of the pain.

 

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER: the content on this blog is for information purposes only and does not constitute medical advise of any kind. If you have pain, any medical condition, have any disability or any doubts about your physical abilities, then consult a physician to determine if you may perform the movements in our videos.

 

 

 

Tags:  Fascial Stretch Therapy  mobility  stretch  stretch to win 

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Great 8™ Mobility Program by Stretch to Win® - glute complex

Posted By Chris Frederick, Tuesday, August 1, 2017

In the previous post, I introduced The Great 8™ Mobility-Flexibility Program from my new book “Stretch to Win”. In our book, we teach you how to use The Great 8 as an assessment that guides you to solutions for pain, improve your athletic performance, faster recovery and optimal fitness.

Starting with the glute complex in this post, I will focus on teaching you each of the 8 key movements for core muscles and their connective tissue attachments that make up your foundation for optimal mobility and flexibility. For simplicity, I will refer to all connective tissue as the fascia net or just ‘net’. Then we just name the net to where it is on the body or what it does in function. Full descriptions and illustrations of all the anatomical nets are found in the book.

The Glute complex is located in what we call the “Back Power Net” because it is located at the back of your hip and is a major muscle of your core and athletic power (see figure below; see p30 in our book for an extensive description). The key muscles accessed for most people in this movement are the piriformis, glute medius, glute maximus and muscles of the low back. Others include muscles of the mid back and neck.

Simply follow the video above, which coaches you through the entire movement for both sides of your body.

Tips:

• Self assessment

o Do the movement on both sides to determine if there is an imbalance.

o Start and end with the tighter side, otherwise it doesn't matter.

o Re-assess the movement when done to see if both sides have improved with symmetrical mobility. If not, repeat tight one.

• If you have any problems getting into the position, doing the movement or have discomfort like pinching in your hip or anywhere else, then find a local Fascial Stretch Therapy Provider in our directory here: www.stretchtowin.com

• If the movement causes or increases pain, then stop and see a health professional to determine the cause of the pain.

 

LIABILITY DISCLAIMER: the content on this blog is for information purposes only and does not constitute medical advise of any kind. If you have pain, any medical condition, have any disability or any doubts about your physical abilities, then consult a physician to determine if you may perform the movements in our videos.

Tags:  Fascial Stretch Therapy  mobility  stretch  stretch to win 

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